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Patrick Magee – MovieActors.com

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Magee in A Clockwork Orange.

About Patrick Magee (1922 – 1982)

Patrick McGee was born on March 31, 1922, in Armagh, County Armagh, Northern Ireland. He died at the age of 60 on August 14, 1982, in London, England. His birth name was Patrick George McGee.

McGee was the first born of five children in a middle-class family and was educated at St. Patrick's Grammar School, Armagh.

He changed the spelling of his family name to Magee for the stage, but not legally. His first stage experience came in Ireland, performing the works of Shakespeare with Anew McMaster's touring company. It was here that he first worked with the renowned playwright Harold Pinter. Subsequently he was brought to London by Tyrone Guthrie for a series of Irish plays. In 1957 he met Samuel Beckett and recorded some of Beckett’s prose for BBC radio. Beckett was so impressed with his voice that he wrote his play Krapp's Last Tape specifically for Magee.

Magee married Belle Sherry, also a native of County Armagh, in 1958. In February 1961, Belle gave birth to twins, Mark and Caroline McGee, in London.

In 1964 Magee joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, after Harold Pinter requested him for the part of McCann in his own play The Birthday Party. A year later he appeared in Peter Weiss's Marat/Sade, and when the play moved to Broadway he was nominated for and won a Tony Award. He also appeared in the 1966 RSC production of Staircase, alongside Paul Scofield.

Magee’s first film roles included Joseph Losey's The Criminal (1960) and The Servant (1963), the latter an adaptation penned by Pinter. The late ‘60s were an especially productive period for him, as he appeared as Surgeon-Major Reynolds in Zulu (1964), Séance on a Wet Afternoon (1964), Anzio (1968), and in the film versions of Marat/Sade (1967; as de Sade) and The Birthday Party (1968). He is probably most well-known for his role as the vengeful writer Frank Alexander, who tortures Alex DeLarge with Beethoven's music, in Stanley Kubrick's film A Clockwork Orange (1971). Magee was again directed by Kubrick in Barry Lyndon (1975), where he played Chevalier de Balibari.

Among Magee’s other film appearances were in such projects as Young Winston (1972), The Final Programme (1973), Galileo (1975), Sir Henry at Rawlinson End (1980), The Monster Club, and Chariots of Fire (1981). Because of his low, gravelly voice, disheveled hair, and aptitude for playing disturbed and/or sadistic characters, Magee was at his most prolific in the horror genre, where he can be seen in such works as The Masque of the Red Death (1964), Die, Monster, Die! (1965), The Skull (1965), Tales from the Crypt (1972), Asylum (1972), And Now the Screaming Starts! (1973) and Demons of the Mind (1972).

Magee had a reputation as a heavy drinker, which may have accounted for his premature death from a heart attack at the age of 60.

Patrick Magee's movie credits include...

Year Movie
1960 The Criminal
1961 Rag Doll
1961 Never Back Losers
1962 The Boys
1962 A Prize of Arms
1963 The Young Racers
1963 The Very Edge
1963 Dementia 13
1963 The Servant
1964 Zulu
1964 Séance on a Wet Afternoon
1964 The Masque of the Red Death
1965 The Skull
1965 Die, Monster, Die!
1967 Marat/Sade
1968 Anzio
1968 The Birthday Party
1969 Hard Contract
1970 Cromwell
1970 You Can't Win 'Em All
1971 King Lear
1971 The Trojan Women
1971 A Clockwork Orange
1971 The Fiend aka Beware My Brethren
1972 Tales from the Crypt
1972 Young Winston
1972 Asylum
1972 Pope Joan
1972 Demons of the Mind
1973 And Now the Screaming Starts!
1973 Lady Ice
1975 The Final Programme
1975 Galileo
1975 Barry Lyndon
1977 Telefon
1979 The Bronte Sisters
1980 The Monster Club
1980 Hawk the Slayer
1980 Rough Cut
1980 Sir Henry at Rawlinson End
1980 The Flipside of Dominick Hide
1981 Chariots of Fire
1981 The Black Cat
1981 Blood of Dr. Jekyll
1981 The Sleep of Death
1982 Another Flip for Dominick
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Patrick Magee in Barry Lyndon (1975).

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Magee in The Final Programme (1975).