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Fredric March, Award Winner – MovieActors.com

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March in THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES.

Fredric March: Best Actor 1932 & 1946: MovieActors.com

1932: DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE (Horror)

Fredric March received his first Oscar for playing the tormented doctor in this classic horror story created by Robert Louis Stevenson.












fredrick-march-image 1946: THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (Drama)

Fredric March received his second Oscar for playing the war veteran who returns to a civilian life and a family that seem alien to him after years of combat.









About Fredric March (1897 – 1975)

Born in Racine, Wisconsin, March was a respected Broadway stage and screen actor, who became a popular movie star of the thirties and forties. Fredric March's real name was Frederick McIntyre Bickel. He was the son of a school teacher, Cora Brown Marcher, and John F. Bickel, a Presbyterian Church Elder who worked in the wholesale hardward business.

Frederick graduated with honors from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, with a degree in economics. After serving in World War 1, Frederick went to work as a banker in New York City.

Frederick had a life-changing experience, that put his life on another course. When Frederick wound up in the hospital with an emergency appendectomy, he rethought his banking career, and decided to follow his first love, acting. Many people who have enjoyed both his stage and film performances were glad he did! Frederick March, who never received any training, turned out to be a treasure to both the theater and films, having much success and having a lot of fun as well.

Frederick married in 1921 to his first wife, Ellis Baker, who supported his decision to become an actor. Their marriage lasted until 1927.

In 1927, Frederick married fellow thespian, Florence Eldridge; a marriage that lasted until March's passing. They adopted two children.

Frederick and Florence frequently acted together in Broadway plays. When one of the Broadway plays they were in, Ye HUSBAND, earned awful reviews, they took out a page in the New York Times, featuring a New York Times cartoon that has a trapeeze performer missing his partner. "OOPS, SORRY!"

Frederic March philosophized on the difference between being an actor in movies and on the stage. "Pictures are physically tiring; the theater is mentally tiring. Pictures last; the theater is built on sand. But I am grateful for my theater experience."

Because Frederic March found so much success in both the theater stage and films, he managed to not have to sign a contract with any one studio, leaving himself open to be in a variety of films from different studios.
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Beginning in 1930, Fredric March began to gather acclaim and honors for his performances, in both plays and films.

Fredric March was nominated for his portrayal of John Barrymore in THE ROYAL FAMILY OF BROADWAY; (1930).

March won the Oscar for Best Actor for DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE; (1931), and THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES; (1946).

In 1937, he was also nominated for an Academy Award for his portrayal of an alcoholic star on his way down, in A STAR IS BORN. Janet Gaynor played the young hopeful starlet he marries in the last hour of his success.

March won the Oscar for Best Actor for his performance in THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES; (1946).

Frederick March commented on the Hollywood machine: "Stardom is just an uneasy seat on top of a tricky toboggan. Being a star is merely perching at the head of the downgrade. A competent featured player can last a lifetime. A star, a year or two. There's all that agony of finding suitable stories, keeping in character, maintaining illusion. Then the undignified position of hanging on while your popularity is declining."

In 1951, Frederic March played the anguished Willy Loman in the film adaptation of DEATH OF A SALESMAN and was nominated for an Oscar for his performance.

Frederick March commented on the Hollywood machine: "Stardom is just an uneasy seat on top of a tricky toboggan. Being a star is merely perching at the head of the downgrade. A competent featured player can last a lifetime. A star, a year or two. There's all that agony of finding suitable stories, keeping in character, maintaining illusion. Then the undignified position of hanging on while your popularity is declining."

Frederic March philosophized on the difference between being an actor in movies and on the stage. "Pictures are physically tiring; the theater is mentally tiring. Pictures last, the theater is built on sand. But I am grateful for my theater experience."

Fredric March's notable movie credits include...

THE ROYAL FAMILY OF BROADWAY (1931)
A STAR IS BORN (1937)
DEATH OF A SALESMAN (1951)
THE AFFAIRS OF CELLINI (1934)
DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY (1934)
LES MISERABLES (1935)
ANNA KARENINA (1935)
MARY OF SCOTLAND (1936)
ANTHONY ADVERSE (1936)
NOTHING SACRED (1937)
THE BUCCANEER (1938)
ONE FOOT IN HEAVEN (1941)
BEDTIME STORY (1941)
I MARRIED A WITCH (1942)
THE ADVENTURES OF MARK TWAIN (1944)
AN ACT OF MURDER (1948)
ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST (1948)
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS (1949)
DEATH OF A SALESMAN (1951)
THE BRIDGES AT TOKO-RI (1954)
EXECUTIVE SUITE (1954)
THE DESPARATE HOURS (1955)
ALEXANDER THE GREAT (1956)
THE MAN IN THE GREY FLANNEL SUIT (1956)
THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT (1959)
INHERIT THE WIND (1960)
THE YOUNG DOCTORS (1961)
THE CONDEMNED OF ALTONA (1962)
SEVEN DAYS IN MAY (1964)
HOMBRE (1967)
TICK TICK TICK (1970)
THE ICEMAN COMETH (1973)


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Fredric March with his co-stars in THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946).

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Fredric March with his co-stars in SEVEN DAYS IN MAY (1964).

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